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Antonio Corradini lived from 1668 until June 1752, and he worked as a Rococo sculptor in Venice. There’s not a lot known about him, but he’s most famous for his veiled women, and it’s not hard to see why.

Her smooth skin shines right through the thin ripples of the veil resting softly – it spills off noses and ears like tiny waterfalls of marble. But the eyes can always be seen so clearly, closed against the veil pressed against them.

Bust of a Veiled Woman (Puritas), 1717-25 Marble Museo del Settecento Veneziano, Ca’ Rezzonico, Venice

Bust of a Veiled Woman (Puritas), 1717-25
Marble
Museo del Settecento Veneziano, Ca’ Rezzonico, Venice
source.

 

Corradini played a huge role in solidifying the role of sculptors as ‘artists’ in the early 18th century. In 1723 he is supposed to have been the first person to legally separate the professions of sculptors and stonemasons, creating a school for sculptors and developing it as an official artistic profession.

His “Portrait of Modesty” (below) lives in the Naples museum, Cappella Sansevero, and her posture and accessories make it look like she was made for a church, even though she’s nearly naked through that thin thin veil – standing casually beautiful with eyes closing.

 

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"Modesty," 1751 Marble, Cappella Sansevero, Napoli

“Modesty,” 1751
Marble, Cappella Sansevero, Napoli
source.

 

Full disclosure: all info from Corradini’s Wikipedia page.

 

 

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